Sunday, July 09, 2006

There's gold in that 'thar' jewelry

Actually, there’s a lot more than gold and a lot more value than there was just three years ago.

In July, 2002, the price of gold was between $303 and $319 per ounce. Today, an ounce of gold is quoted on the spot market at $632 per ounce.

Silver has been no slouch either. In July, 2002, an ounce of silver would have cost between $4.82 and $5.05. Today, it’s worth $11.38.

My math calls that doubling in value.

Now, this is not an argument for going out and buying gold or silver bullion as an investment. It is a fact, however, that prices that were set by many Native American jewelry sellers based on 2002 costs have not been raised since then. Specifically, Aboriginals: Art of the First Person’s Native American jewelry web site,
http://www.native-jewelrylink.com , which specializes in top quality Hopi, Isleta, Navajo and Zuni jewelry is still charging the same price for its gold and silver jewelry as it was three years ago.

Today’s replacement cost for those items comes close to today’s retail price. In fact, during our most recent trip to the tribal jewelry-makers of Arizona and New Mexico, we were told by at least one highly respected name artist that she no longer works in gold because of its cost.

Which makes gold and/or silver jewelry, hand-made by the artisans of Native America, an extraordinary value at today’s prices. And the beauty of the work makes it a far superior investment to precious metal bullion. After all, you can’t wear a silver bar.

Native-JewelryLink is pledged to hold its Native American jewelry prices right where they are for the time being. And, as a reader of our e-newsletter and blog, Tribal Artery, if you identify yourself by citing the promo code “Tribal Artery”, we will give you a 10% discount right off the top of any regular current price if you order before August 1, 2006.

Happy prospecting.


Editor's Note: It has been several months since our last blog posting. Thanks for revisiting. We plan to be more active in future weeks. In the meantime, our web sites at ZuniLink and Native-PotteryLink remain active, with new items being posted whenever they arrive. We welcome your visit.