Friday, February 12, 2010

SWAIA reveals 2010 Indian Market Poster Artist

This blog is devoted to tribal art from many different cultures.
The sponsors, TribalWorks. com, ZuniLink.com, Native-PotteryLink.com and Native-PotteryLink.com, try to deal with all of them representatively. Today's subject relates to Native American art and one of the most respected voices in its support.


Breaking with a tradition of naming new and emerging artists as the Indian Market Poster Artist of the Year, Southwestern Association for the Indian Arts has announced that Geronima Cruz Montoya, venerated Ohkay Owingeh (San Juan) artist's work will be honored on this year's poster.

Montoya, who will be 95 during the month following Indian Market, has been both a legend and an institution in Native American art. Her painting that will appear on the poster depicts a number of young Indian women engaged in typical Pueblo crafts. Each wears traditional clothing while they create pottery, weave, embroider and work on moccasins. The painting was created in 1938. The original hangs in the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture.

Montoya's appointment and the poster design were revealed at a special luncheon in Santa Fe on February 10, 2010. She is quoted in the Santa Fe New Mexican as reflecting that "doing the old things brings back memories from years ago, the things that just aren't done much any more."

For more information about Montoya's colorful like, which has been devoted to art, use this link http://www.santafenewmexican.com

This development leads me to wonder if recent awards at Indian Market didn't push the edge of traditional Indian art a little too far into the non-traditional. I recall thinking that numerous winners in the past couple of years, while adventurous and thought-provoking, had moved a long way from the subjects and techniques that have characterized the genre in the past. These are aspects that had established a large and vibrant pool of supporters and buyers.

I wonder if push back from buyers who have decided to sit on their purses - for whatever reason - may have played a role in this return to the roots of Native American Indian art.

In any case, I applaud the recognition of more traditional techniques and the honor bestowed on Geronima Cruz Montoya, who deserves it.

What do you think?

1 comment:

Adeline said...

Awesome Info shared with us. Thanks for that. I like very pleasant designed Posters.